4/4 Maple Table Top: 48 x 13

$68.75

Only 1 left in stock

Hard maple is creamy white with a reddish tinge and usually has a straight grain, sometimes curly or wavy. Fine brown growth rings give an attractive figure on plain sawn surfaces. Difficult wood to work with moderate dulling effect on cutters. Wavy or curly grains require a reduced cutting angle. Pre-drilling required for nailing and screwing. Takes stain, glue and polish satisfactorily. Heartwood is non-durable and sapwood is susceptible to attack by furniture beetle. Defects caused by insects (pith flecks) are sometimes found. Heartwood is resistant to preservative treatment, but sapwood is permeable. Suitable for furniture, joinery, heavy-duty flooring, dairy and laundry equipment, sporting goods, piano actions, paneling, plywood, veneering. Excellent for turning.

Only 1 left in stock

SKU: MAP44TT-48X13 Categories: , ,

Description

Common Name(s):
Hard Maple, Sugar Maple, Rock Maple

Scientific Name:
Acer saccharum

Distribution:
Northeastern North America

Tree Size:
80-115 ft (25-35 m) tall, 2-3 ft (.6-1.0 m) trunk diamete

Color/Appearance:
Unlike most other hardwoods, the sapwood of Hard Maple lumber is most commonly used rather than its heartwood. Sapwood color ranges from nearly white, to an off-white cream color, sometimes with a reddish or golden hue. The heartwood tends to be a darker reddish brown. Birdseye Maple is a figure found most commonly in Hard Maple, though it’s also found less frequently in other species. Hard Maple can also be seen with curly or quilted grain patterns.

Grain/Texture:
Grain is generally straight, but may be wavy. Has a fine, even texture.

Endgrain:
Diffuse-porous; medium pores that are uniformly spaced, moderately numerous to numerous; solitary and radial multiples of 2-3; heartwood deposits sometimes present; parenchyma marginal; both narrow and wide rays, spacing normal.

Workability:
Fairly easy to work with both hand and machine tools, though slightly more difficult than Soft Maple due to Hard Maple’s higher density. Maple has a tendency to burn when being machined with high-speed cutters such as in a router. Turns, glues, and finishes well, though blotches can occur when staining, and a pre-conditioner, gel stain, or toner may be necessary to get an even color.

Common Uses:
Flooring (from basketball courts and dance-floors to bowling alleys and residential), veneer, paper (pulpwood), musical instruments, cutting boards, butcher blocks, workbenches, baseball bats, and other turned objects and specialty wood items